Twitter

24/07/20

Very proud of our very own Ms Bent. https://t.co/mvFFPJHS68

27/06/20

Retweetd From G E N E V I E V E 🇯🇲

Created a school resource for Unconscious Bias. Delivered as an assembly this week, with a student task at the end. Continuation of our  provision, along with this week’s staff training by If anyone’s interested, I will upload on TES 😊 https://t.co/YewMrrAhwP

22/06/20

We would like to wish our students and families a Happy Windrush Day. Our students have been looking at the importance of the Windrush generation last week as part of our Wellbeing Day Friday. .WeCan.WeWill. https://t.co/nibWiOhDZZ

18/06/20

Retweetd From G E N E V I E V E 🇯🇲

Friday - 6pm! Via Twitter Please share with any of your young people/parents or networks! 🥺🥺🥺 https://t.co/HZCbwSFElJ

17/06/20

Retweetd From Rowenna Davis

Really proud of our 13-year-old Elijah from creating amazing art work & raising money for . To see his work & donate visit https://t.co/SH58goK2dP https://t.co/yRKJE7EQzE

17/06/20

Retweetd From G E N E V I E V E 🇯🇲

I am VERY passionate about the Windrush Generation as a 2nd Generation Black British Caribbean Woman. If anyone would like a copy of the Windrush Resources, I’ve made for my school, for , next Monday 22nd, just let me know! 🇯🇲🇱🇨🇹🇹🇰🇳🇬🇩🇧🇧🇦🇬🇧🇸 https://t.co/8qAi5UdlHm

17/06/20

Retweetd From G E N E V I E V E 🇯🇲

The Official Small Island play - based on the fictional book by Andrea Levy centred during the Windrush era - is being streamed LIVE & FREE through YouTube, from Starting Thursday 18th at 7pm! It wills also double up as fundraiser ❤️https://t.co/BgHozeqL2B

17/06/20

Retweetd From G E N E V I E V E 🇯🇲

Good morning 🌞 I’ve put together the Windrush Reading List! Not exhaustive by any means! But download if you like 😁 and SHARE 😁 Happy Windrush Reading 🇯🇲🇹🇹🇬🇩🇧🇧🇧🇸🇰🇳🇻🇨🇩🇲🇦🇬🇦🇮🇱🇨 Available here 👉🏾 https://t.co/qrht31Ouj2 Please leave feedback!

18/05/20

If you are experiencing difficulties opening the staff choir link alternatively please open Spotify and search for Harris Invictus Staff Choir. It’s not to be missed! We Know. We Can. We Will.

18/05/20

Take a look at our fabulous staff singing “Somewhere over the Rainbow 🌈 ” dedicated to our amazing NHS staff and keyworkers We Know. We Can. We Will. https://t.co/cbE4oHPonT

18/05/20

Harris Invictus Staff Choir is now live on Spotify singing “Somewhere over the Rainbow”, in dedication to all our NHS staff and keyworkers who are working exceptionally hard to look after us all. We Know. We Can. We Will https://t.co/cbE4oHPonT

10/05/20

Retweetd From Department for Education

National Crime Agency’s has created a series of activity packs to help you protect your children online 💻 Each pack contains simple 15-minute activities for children age 4-14+ 👇 https://t.co/zckxo1OWxk https://t.co/xT08hC55Bd

04/05/20

We would like to remind all HIAC students, parents and carers our first assembly is this morning at 8.30 https://t.co/M0tClssVjQ

30/04/20

We would like to invite all HIAC students, parents and carers to tune into our first remote Assembly - Monday 4th May at 8.30am via teams We Know. We Can. We Will

19/03/20

Reminder- today - Thursday 19/3/20 partial closure. Years 8,9&10 students will be working from home today. All other year groups are to attend the Academy as normal. Please see our website on a daily basis for more details.

18/03/20

Thursday 19/3/20 partial closure. Years 8,9&10 will be working from home tomorrow. All other year groups should attend the Academy as normal.

18/03/20

Reminder - Today - Wednesday 18/3/20 partial closure. Years 8&9 students will be working from home today. All other year groups to attend the Academy as normal. Please see our website for more details on a daily basis.

17/03/20

Wednesday 18/03/20 partial closure. Years 8&9 will be working from home tomorrow. All other year groups should attend the Academy as normal.

13/12/19

Retweetd From CroydonVA

Thank you Mr Mayor for supporting for awarding talented students at the Community Showcase https://t.co/NB2koJaBR8

10/12/19

Another fantastic piece of news from HIAC - our Under 14 boys have WON the Basketball Croydon Cup yesterday- gold medals all round!! Bring on the next competition!! Many thanks to all involved especially Mr Simpson and Coach Raymond We Know. We Can. We Will. https://t.co/UMasAUnRpP

Harris Academies
All Academies in our Federation aim to transform the lives of the students they serve by bringing about rapid improvement in examination results, personal development and aspiration.

Central Office

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Greenwich

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Havering

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Newham

Southwark

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Thurrock

Wandsworth

Westminster

Computer Science

What is the intention of the Computer Science Curriculum?

A modern Computer Science curriculum sits on the intersection of science and creativity.  It possesses a strong scientific base, fashioned as it is on logical and mathematical principles, and dexterity within the key aspects of Computer Science enable students to unleash their creative minds.

It encompasses a variety of complementary strands, incorporating:

Computational thinking – the principles of solving problems and designing systems through decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition, logical and algorithmic reasoning, and data representation

Digital literacy and creativity – the ability to locate, evaluate and use digital hardware and software in a creative or purposeful manner

Information technology – the ability to capture and analyse data, and to make relevant changes in response to the data presented, using either software or hardware devices

Communication – the exchange of information between multiple parties, not necessarily via digital media

Ethical and social impact – revolving around the legal and moral principles that govern how an individual or a collective body of people conduct themselves.  At present this would be largely using digital media as a conduit – such as the use of social media apps in relation to cyber bullying or internet safety or copyright law.  Increasingly social and ethical questions will arise with respect to how we relate to Artificially Intelligent entities, and how they relate to us.

Safety – incorporating ergonomic aspects such as the prolonged use of a tablet, mouse or keyboard, in addition to internet safety concerns such as cyber security or cyber bullying awareness.

Resilience – many Computer Science concepts will be unfamiliar to the students, in particular units which entail elements such as binary manipulation, programming or logical theory. An essential component of successfully solving complex challenges is the ability to independently break down, tackle and solve problems, and to develop a level of resilience in their approach to this.

It is important to be cognisant of the technological trends of the 21st Century, but the intention of the Computer Science curriculum at Harris Federation is not simply to equip students to attain employment in a variety of information technology jobs.  It is to foster within them a deep understanding of the principles outlined above, and to provide them with the communication skills, the flexibility of mindset, and the fearlessness when tackling complex problems that will serve them so well in the future.

How will this be implemented?

This Computer Science scheme of work has been developed to reflect the current National Curriculum for Computer Science in Key Stages 3 and 4, and the AQA GCSE Computer Science (8520) specification.

At Key Stage 3 the assumption is that, on a weekly basis, students will receive one lesson of approximately 55 minutes in length.  At Key Stage 4 the assumption is that, on a weekly basis, students will receive three lessons of approximately 55 minutes in length.

The units of work are intended to be delivered over half-termly blocks, with assessment at key points throughout the year. Clearly if the offering of the schools is significantly different to this assumption then tweaks will have to be made – for example some academies within the Federation offer Computer Studies in Key Stage 3 in only certain year groups, or on a rotational timetable.  Other academies are offering students the ability to commence their GCSE studies in Year 9.  This document is necessarily somewhat generic and academies are likely to implement their own particular strands of this curriculum.  The assumption remains that within Key Stage 3 to Key Stage 4, the academies fulfil the statutory requirements of the national curriculum, as reproduced below – Assessment Objectives have been added in order to explicate the link between the National Curriculum and our curriculum overview table immediately following it.

National Curriculum Subject content

Key Stage 3

Pupils should be taught to:

  • [AO1] design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems (Information Technology)
  • [AO2] understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem (Computational Thinking)
  • [AO3] use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions (Computational Thinking)
  • [AO4] understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal] (Computational Thinking)
  • [AO5] understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems (Information Technology)
  • [AO6] understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits (Computational Thinking)
  • [AO7] undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users (Information Technology)
  • [AO8] create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability (Digital Literacy)
  • [AO9] understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns (Digital Literacy)

    Key Stage 4

    All pupils must have the opportunity to study aspects of information technology and computer science at sufficient depth to allow them to progress to higher levels of study or to a professional career.

    All pupils should be taught to:

  • develop their capability, creativity and knowledge in computer science, digital media and information technology
  • develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills
  • understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to identify and report a range of concerns.

Harris Federation curriculum overview – Key Stage 3

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 7

Introduction to Digital Literacy

 

Using the Academy Systems

 

Cloud & collaborative authoring

 

[AO8]

[AO9]

Introduction to Computer Systems - hardware and Software

 

History of Systems

 

Introduction to Computer Networks

 

[AO5]

[AO6]

 

Introduction to E-Safety and Web Development

 

Search Technology

 

 

 

 

 

[AO2]

[AO9]

 

Web Development Continued

 

Data representation, Binary denary conversion

 

[AO4]

[AO6]

Introduction to Visual Programming: Code.org/ Physical Computing: Microbit

 

Introduction to Algorithms

 

[AO2]

[AO3]

[AO8]

Visual Programming Continued: Kodu

 

Digital sound manipulation via Audacity

(Music)

 

 

[AO6]

AO7]

[AO8]

Year 8

 

Introduction to Cyber Security and Web Development

 

History and evolution of computer technology

 

[AO5]

Introduction to Cyber Security and Web Development

 

Computer networks & topologies.  Cloud computing.

 

[AO4]

[A05]

Introduction to Programming Theory: Seneca Learning

 

Py Combat

 

Python programming

 

 

 

[AO2]

[AO3]

Introduction to Programming Theory: Seneca Learning

 

Boolean logic – AND OR NOT

 

 

[AO2]

[AO3]

Introduction Data Representation: Binary Conversion and Addition

 

Data handling - Spreadsheet manipulation - intermediate

 

[AO1][AO7][AO4][AO6]

Image manipulation – Pixlr / Photoshop.

 

 

 

 

[AO6]

[AO7]

[AO8]

 

 

 

Year 9

Data handling – spreadsheet manipulation – intermediate.  Nested Ifs, Vlookup, Break-even.

 

 

 

[AO1]

[AO7]

[AO9]

Networks, hardware and IP addresses. 

 

Boolean logic intermediate.

 

 

 

[AO2]

 

[AO4]

[AO5]

E safety, social and ethical use of technology.

 

Phishing, pharming, privacy, copyright, reporting.

 

 

[A08]

[AO9]

Programming – Python intermediate.

String handling, subroutines, arrays.

Pseudocode.

 

 

 

 

[AO2]

[AO3]

Digital applications – combining images, sound and website concepts – project.

 

 

[AO6]

[AO7]

[AO8]

[AO9]

Digital applications – combining images, sound and website concepts – project.

 

 

 

 

[AO6]

[AO7]

[AO8]

[AO9]

 

Harris Federation curriculum overview – Key Stage 4

The Key Stage 4 curriculum requires the students to:

  • Develop their capability, creativity and knowledge in computer science, digital media and information technology
  • Develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design and computational thinking skills
  • Understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to identify and report a range of concerns

The following is an overview for teaching the AQA GCSE Computer Science course; again, some academies within the Federation have opted for another qualification, such as the Cambridge Nationals – Information Technologies (J808).

In the AQA course, the programming project has now morphed into a non-examined assessment (NEA) – however it remains a mandatory element of the GCSE, and can serve as a useful opportunity to consolidate programming skills.    According, students should complete a succession of exercises that require them to formally design, test and evaluate a software solution, and to reflect and report upon their work.  The time allocated to this project is 20 hours, and has been referred to below – it is up to the discretion of the school to determine at what point to introduce and pursue the NEA.

 

GCSE AQA Computer Science Overview

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 10

Data types, identifiers, operators, algorithms, selection,

arrays, operators, iteration, string handling, validation, authentication.

 

 

 

1D arrays, search algorithms, sorting algorithms, trace tables, abstraction, decomposition, subroutines, integer division, structured programming, char and Boolean data types,

 

Text file handling, 2D arrays, nested iteration, constants, records, authentication, pseudocode, flowcharts.

 

 

 

 

Non-exam assessment intro

Low level & high level languages, machine code, assembler, interpreters, compilers, translators, data representation, binary, denary, hex, bit units, binary addition and logical shifts.

 

Non-exam assessment continues

 

ASCII, Unicode, bitmap images,  sound files, sample rate, resolution, file sizes, compression, Huffman encoding, RLE, truth tables, logic circuits.

 

 

Non-exam assessment continues

Von Neumann architecture, fetch-execute cycle, memory, secondary storage, cloud storage, embedded systems, hardware & software, OS, utility programs.

 

 

 

Non-exam assessment completed

Year 11

Networks, LAN, WAN, PAN, star, bus, protocols, security, encryption, firewall, MAC addresses, filtering, 4 layer TCP/IP model, cyber security, malware, social engineering, penetration testing.

Ethical, legal and environmental impacts, hacking, cracking, cloud storage, cyber security, copyright of algorithms, intellectual property, risks and benefits of wireless and mobile technologies, wearable technologies, computer implants, privacy vs safety.

 

 

Revision & exam prep

Further consolidation:

Arrays, selection, iteration, search algorithms, trace tables, subroutines, constants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revision & exam prep

Further consolidation:

Logic, truth tables, pseudocode, flowcharts, file size calculation, RLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revision & exam prep

Revision & exam prep

 

 

An overview for delivery of the Cambridge National in Information Technologies at Key Stage 4

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 10

LO1: Understanding Initiating and planning solutions

 

Gantts, PERTS, flow charts, spreadsheets, critical paths

LO3: Use of Data

 

Data types, Boolean, information, collecting data, cloud and physical storage, ethics.

 

 

LO4: Data collection and processing

 

Malware, social engineering, hacking, DDoS, vulnerabilities, consequences, prevention and risk management, legislation, reliability

 

LO4: Data collection and processing

 

Malware, social engineering, hacking, DDoS, vulnerabilities, consequences, prevention and risk management, legislation, reliability

 

LO5: import and manipulate data to meet an identified need.

 

Advanced spreadsheet and database application use

LO6: Different methods of processing data and presenting information.

 

Spreadsheets, databases, multimedia, hardware, software, connectivity.

 

Year 11

LO2: Initiate and planning solutions

 

SWOT, contingencies, security and ethics, test plans

 

LO7: Iteratively review and evaluate the solution.

 

LO8: Select and present information to meet an identified need.

 

Creating, importing and linking content across a variety of applications

Application of knowledge – coursework assignment tasks

Final submission of coursework unit

Exam preparation

 

 

Resources

A great many approaches and resources exist within the realms of Computer Science websites, forums and commercially available unit plans.  Many of them are excellent in delivering specific lessons, and you are of course encouraged to use any resources that serve your needs.  Many of them however do not have any particular focus on UK curriculum delivery, progression through the units, or a wider assessment focus.  This is the reason for the creation of this curriculum intent document – it draws upon the statutory requirements for Computing delivery in Key Stage 2, and it ensures coherence between Key Stage 3 concepts and those of the GCSE Computer Science programme.  The units outlined here allow students to develop a deep and rich understanding of the concepts running through Computing, and to enable both less confident learners and more able participants to access the curriculum.  Many of the software packages used to deliver Computer Science are open source and free, such as Python, Pixlr or Audacity.  Hardware solutions within the academies are very much subject to the needs of the individual academy – ranging from standard PCs, Arduinos or Raspberry Pi devices, sensors and actuators, and server / cloud solutions.  This document does not make any assumptions in terms of hardware provision – for example the units suggested in Year 7 Spring 1, Year 8 Spring 1 and Year 9 Autumn 2 could be delivered perfectly well without particular hardware within the classroom.  The class teacher may well have access to hardware which could further bring to life such concepts, but we make no assumption with respect to this.

Professional Development

The Harris Federation offers a number of INSET days, coordinator meetings, conferences and department meetings, in addition to support from the Computer Science consultant via lesson planning, co-teaching, resources creation and mentoring.  There are also some excellent organisations now who offer advice and training, including one off occurrences such as The Bett Show or membership of organisations such as CAS or the National Centre for Computing Education.  The aim is to give teachers the knowledge, skills and confidence to deliver the very best Computer Science lessons, and to imbue the next generation of students with a love of the subject.

Literacy

Acronyms and subject-specific nouns run throughout Computer Science; the expectation is that teachers are precise and specific in their written and spoken use of terms that are likely to be unfamiliar to their students, and that the students are given opportunities to develop and demonstrate clear understanding of them.

How will we judge the impact of the curriculum?

Assessment should be both formative and summative.  Within lessons, teachers should use formative assessment to judge the progress that students are making, and to support and challenge them accordingly.

Throughout Key Stage 3, students should receive a summative multiple choice test at the end of each unit.  The purpose of this is to diagnose issues within the class – so that a teacher intervenes in the case of underperformance against age related expectations, and equally is able to celebrate students whose performance is above expectations.

In both Key Stage 3 and 4, there are two assessment points during the academic year, in which students sit a more formal assessment paper.  This will assess the content they have studied up until that point.

A secondary Computer Science curriculum lends itself towards an electronic portfolio-based assessment approach, and this is something that would allow the students to demonstrate subject knowledge and skills, and other areas of learning such as resilience and an awareness of ethical matters such as copyright or data protection.  For example the students could electronically screen capture their progress in a programming unit, commenting upon their progress and outlining success and challenges they have encountered. Some students could also, via teacher guidance, specifically outline how resilient they feel their approach has been throughout the unit.  Some might reflect upon the use of that particular programming language amongst a company such as Google or Spotify, and what this means with respect to mass gathering and analysis of user data form an ethical or legal viewpoint.  A portfolio-based approach can easily be extended to challenge the more able students within the class, and via electronic submission can enable the teacher to provide formative and summative assessment.

Attainment and progress

Once students have sat their tests, data is stored centrally within the Harris Federation.  This data can then be standardised and can provide us with a snapshot of the current attainment and progress of the students, allowing us to intervene where necessary.

Destinations

The presence of the Computer Science GCSE qualification in the English Baccalaureate has led to a renewed interest in the subject in recent years.  Having attained a GCSE qualification, students may continue to study the subject in a panoply of post-16 qualifications or could use the qualification to progress their careers outside of studying.  There is currently a need within the employment market for students with such qualifications, and a greater need for young adults to demonstrate that they possess problem-solving, analytical skills and an element of fearlessness and resilience.